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Patient resources

Explore patient testimonials, educational
resources,
tools, and materials designed to help
you. We add to
this page periodically. Be sure to
check in again soon
for new resources.

Learn about one patient’s journey

Hear from a patient on NOURIANZ® (istradefylline) and a care partner

Learn about
one patient’s journey

Hear from a patient on NOURIANZ® (istradefylline)
and a care partner

NOURIANZ Brochure

If you’re taking carbidopa/levodopa and experiencing “off” time, ask your doctor if adding once-daily NOURIANZ to your treatment is appropriate for you and download this
NOURIANZ brochure.

DOWNLOAD
DOWNLOAD

Doctor Discussion Guide

This tool can help you to recognize and keep track of the signs of “off” time in PD. It also provides some important questions you may want to ask your doctor at your next visit. Taking notes on your daily experiences and preparing for your next appointment can help facilitate conversations with your medical team and doctor so they can better understand your needs and make the right
treatment choices for you.

DOWNLOAD
DOWNLOAD

Wellness Team Contact Information Organizer

This form can help you keep track of the names, addresses, and phone numbers of your healthcare providers. Reprinted and provided with permission by the Davis Phinney Foundation.

DOWNLOAD
DOWNLOAD

Goal Summary for Doctor’s Visits

This form can help you set wellness goals with your doctor and track your progress between visits. By filling out a new form each time you visit your doctor, you can work toward improving your wellness and create a record of your progress over time. Reprinted and provided with permission by the Davis Phinney Foundation.

DOWNLOAD
DOWNLOAD

NOURIANZ Overview

This video provides an overview of NOURIANZ as an
option for Parkinson’s disease (PD) and “off” time.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is an “off” episode or “off” time?
    • An “off” episode is a time when a patient’s medications for Parkinson's disease (PD) are not working well, causing a return in PD symptoms, such as a tremor and difficulty walking.

  • Can NOURIANZ® reduce “off” time?
    • In clinical trials, adult patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who took NOURIANZ with levodopa, with or without other PD medications, had less “off” time. See NOURIANZ clinical trial results.

  • What are the possible side effects of NOURIANZ?
    • NOURIANZ may cause serious side effects,
      including:

      • uncontrolled sudden movements (dyskinesia). Uncontrolled sudden movements is one of the most common side effects. NOURIANZ may cause uncontrolled sudden movements or make such movements you already have worse or more
        frequent. Tell your healthcare provider if this happens
      • hallucinations and other symptoms of psychosis. NOURIANZ can cause abnormal thinking and behavior including:
        • being overly suspicious or feeling people want to harm you (paranoid ideation)
        • believing things that are not real (delusions)
        • seeing or hearing things that are not real (hallucinations)
        • confusion
        • increased activity or talking (mania)
        • disorientation
        • aggressive behavior
        • agitation
        • delirium (decreased awareness of things around you)

      If you have hallucinations or any other abnormal thinking or behavior, talk with your healthcare provider.

      • unusual urges (impulse control or compulsive behaviors). Some people taking NOURIANZ get urges to behave in a way unusual for them. Examples of this are unusual urges to gamble, increased sexual urges, strong urges to spend money, binge eating, and the inability to control these urges. If you notice or your family notices that you are developing any unusual behaviors, talk to your healthcare provider

      The most common side effects of NOURIANZ include uncontrolled movements (dyskinesia), dizziness, constipation, nausea, hallucinations, and problems sleeping (insomnia).

      These are not all the possible side effects of NOURIANZ.

      Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088, or at www.fda.gov/safety.

  • What should my healthcare provider know before deciding if NOURIANZ may be right for me?
    • Before you take NOURIANZ, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

      • have a history of abnormal movement (dyskinesia)
      • have reduced liver function
      • smoke cigarettes
      • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. NOURIANZ may harm your unborn baby
      • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if NOURIANZ passes into breast milk.
        You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take NOURIANZ or breastfeed

      Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

      NOURIANZ and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. NOURIANZ may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how NOURIANZ works.

      Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

  • How should NOURIANZ be taken?
      • Take NOURIANZ exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to
      • Take NOURIANZ one time each day
      • You can take NOURIANZ with or without food
      • If you take too much NOURIANZ, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away
  • What are the ingredients in NOURIANZ?
    • The active ingredient in NOURIANZ is istradefylline. The inactive ingredients are crospovidone, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, hypromellose, polyethylene glycol 3350, titanium dioxide, triacetin, iron oxide red, iron oxide yellow, and carnauba wax.

  • Is there financial support for out-of-pocket treatment costs for NOURIANZ?
    • If your doctor has prescribed NOURIANZ and you need help with the out-of-pocket cost, the Kyowa Kirin Cares program may be able to help.

      Eligible commercially insured patients may pay as little as $20 for a 1-month supply of NOURIANZ. For full program eligibility requirements, terms, conditions, and limitations, click here.

      Kyowa Kirin Cares also provides information, support, and other resources to eligible patients. For more information about Kyowa Kirin Cares, click here.

      If you need help paying for NOURIANZ, the Kyowa Kirin Cares program may be able to help you get the information and resources you need to start and stay with NOURIANZ.

      Visit Kyowa Kirin Cares for more information, including full eligibility requirements, terms, and conditions.

Organizations for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD)
and their care partners

Kyowa Kirin is a proud sponsor of the following foundations and their goals:

Logo for Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research
The Michael J. Fox Foundation

Dedicated to finding a cure and ensuring the development of improved therapies

Logo for Parkinson’s Foundation
Parkinson’s Foundation

To make life better through improved care and advance research for a cure

Logo for American Parkinson Disease Association
American Parkinson Disease Association

Provides information, education, support, activities, events, and referrals

Logo of Davis Phinney foundation for Parkinson’s
Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinson’s

Funds essential information, tools, inspiration for those living with PD,
as well as research on exercise, speech, movement, and more

Logo of Parkinson Alliance
Parkinson Alliance

Raising funds for research to end PD, support new therapy development,
and provide patient-centered resources

Logo of Parkinson and Movement Disorder (PMD) Alliance
Parkinson & Movement Disorder Alliance

Provides opportunities for meaningful connections through national,
independent non-profit funding

 
BACK TO TOP
What is NOURIANZ?

NOURIANZ is a prescription medicine used with levodopa and carbidopa to treat adults with Parkinson’s disease (PD) who are having “off” episodes. It is not known if NOURIANZ is safe and effective in children.

Important Safety Information
Before you take NOURIANZ, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:
  • have a history of abnormal movement (dyskinesia)
  • have reduced liver function
  • smoke cigarettes
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. NOURIANZ may harm your unborn baby
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if NOURIANZ passes into breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take NOURIANZ or breastfeed

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

NOURIANZ and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. NOURIANZ may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how NOURIANZ works.

What are the possible side effects of NOURIANZ?
NOURIANZ may cause serious side effects, including:

  • uncontrolled sudden movements (dyskinesia). Uncontrolled sudden movements is one of the most common side effects.
  • hallucinations and other symptoms of psychosis. NOURIANZ can cause abnormal thinking and behavior, including:
    • being overly suspicious or feeling people want to harm you (paranoid ideation)
    • believing things that are not real (delusions)
    • seeing or hearing things that are not real (hallucinations)
    • confusion
    • increased activity or talking (mania)
    • disorientation
    • aggressive behavior
    • agitation
    • delirium (decreased awareness of things around you)
  • unusual urges (impulse control or compulsive behaviors). Some people taking NOURIANZ get urges to behave in a way unusual for them. Examples of this are unusual urges to gamble, increased sexual urges, strong urges to spend money, binge eating, and the inability to control these urges.

If you notice or your family notices that you are developing any new or unusual symptoms or behaviors, talk to your healthcare provider.

The most common side effects of NOURIANZ include uncontrolled movements (dyskinesia), dizziness, constipation, nausea, hallucinations, and problems sleeping (insomnia).

These are not all the possible side effects of NOURIANZ.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see Patient Information for NOURIANZ.

References: 1.NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf. 2.Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson’s disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144.

References: 1. Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson's disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144. 2. Mori A. Mode of action of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists as symptomatic treatment for Parkinson’s disease. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2014;119:87-116. 3. Varani K, Vincenzi F, Tosi A, et al. A2A adenosine receptor overexpression and functionality, as well as TNF-α levels, correlate with motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease. FASEB J. 2010;24(2):587-598. doi:10.1096/fj.09-141044. 4. Fuxe K, Marcellino D, Genedani S, Agnati L. Adenosine A2A receptors, dopamine D2 receptors and their interactions in Parkinson's disease. Mov Disord. 2007;22(14):1990-2017. doi: 10.1002/mds.21440. 5. Morelli M, Di Paolo T, Wardas J, Calon F, Xiao D, Schwarzschild MA. Role of adenosine A2A receptors in parkinsonian motor impairment and L-DOPA-induced motor complications. Prog Neurobiol. 2007;83(5):293-309. 6. Morelli M, Blandini F, Simola N, Hauser RA. A2A receptor antagonism and dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease. Parkinsons Dis. 2012;2012:489853. doi: 10.1155/2012/489853. 7. Mishina M, Ishiwata K. Adenosine receptor PET imaging in human brain. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2014;119:51-69. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-801022-8.00002-7. 8. The voice of the patient: Parkinson’s disease. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; April 2016. https://www.fda.gov/media/124392/download. Accessed June 11, 2019. 9. Hickey P, Stacy M. Available and emerging treatments for Parkinson’s disease: a review. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2011;5:241-254. 10. Stocchi F, Antonini A, Barone P, et al. Early DEtection of wEaring off in Parkinson disease: the DEEP study. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2014;20(2):204-211.

References: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf 2. Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson’s disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144. 3. Jenner P. Istradefylline, a novel adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2005;14(6):729-738. 4. Brichta L, Greengard P, Flajolet M. Advances in the pharmacological treatment of Parkinson’s disease: targeting neurotransmitter systems. Trends Neurosci. 2013;36(9):543-554. 5. Kaakkola S, Wurtman RJ. Effects of COMT inhibitors on striatal dopamine metabolism: a microdialysis study. Brain Res. 1992;587(2):241-249. 6. Kong P, Zhang B, Lei P, et al. Neuroprotection of MAO-B inhibitor and dopamine agonist in Parkinson disease. Int J Clin Exp Med. 2015;8(1):431-439. 7. Ossola B, Schendzielorz N, Chen SH, et al. Amantadine protects dopamine neurons by a dual action: reducing activation of microglia and inducing expression of GDNF in astroglia. Neuropharmacology. 2011;61(4):574-582. 8. Rubí B, Maechler P. Minireview: new roles for peripheral dopamine on metabolic control and tumor growth: let’s seek the balance. Endocrinology. 2010;151(12):5570-5581. doi:10.1210/en.2010-0745. 9. Gerlach M, Double K, Arzberger T, Leblhuber F, Tatschner T, Riederer P. Dopamine receptor agonists in current clinical use: comparative dopamine receptor binding profiles defined in the human striatum. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2003;110(10):1119-1127. 10. Ishibashi K, Miura Y, Wagatsuma K, Toyohara J, Ishiwata K, Ishii K. Adenosine A2A receptor occupancy by long-term istradefylline administration in Parkinson’s disease. Mov Disord. 2021;36(1):268-269. doi:10.1002/mds.28378.

References: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf 2. Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson’s disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144. 3. Data on file. Kyowa Kirin Pharmaceutical Development, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

References: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf 2. Data on file. Kyowa Kirin Pharmaceutical Development, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

Reference: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf

Reference: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf