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NOURIANZ® can fit into
your schedule with a once‑daily
pill that can be taken any time,
with or without food

NOURIANZ once-daily dosing can be flexible

  • NOURIANZ comes in 20 mg and 40 mg
    strengths—you and your doctor will
    work together to figure out which
    dosage works for you
  • Take NOURIANZ exactly as
    your doctor tells you to

  • If you take too much NOURIANZ,
    call your doctor or go to the
    nearest hospital emergency
    room right away

  • NOURIANZ should be stored at room
    temperature between 68°F to 77°F
    (20°C to 25°C)
  • Keep NOURIANZ and all medicines

    out of the reach of children




Before you take NOURIANZ, tell your healthcare provider
about all your
medical conditions,
including if you:

  • have a history of abnormal movement (dyskinesia)
  • have reduced liver function
  • smoke cigarettes
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. NOURIANZ may harm your unborn baby
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if NOURIANZ passes into breast milk.
    You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take NOURIANZ or breastfeed
NOURIANZ white pill icon

If your Parkinson’s symptoms
are starting to return, ask your
doctor about adding a treatment
that works differently.

NOURIANZ has been prescribed to
more than 90,000 people living with
Parkinson’s in the US and Japan.

NOURIANZ prescribed graphic

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription
and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

NOURIANZ and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects.
NOURIANZ may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines
may affect how NOURIANZ works.

Know the medicines you take.
Keep a list of them to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

NOURIANZ certificate icon

If “off” time is keeping you
from moments that matter to you,
ask your doctor about adding
once-daily NOURIANZ.

 
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What is NOURIANZ?

NOURIANZ is a prescription medicine used with levodopa and carbidopa to treat adults with Parkinson’s disease (PD) who are having “off” episodes. It is not known if NOURIANZ is safe and effective in children.

Important Safety Information
Before you take NOURIANZ, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:
  • have a history of abnormal movement (dyskinesia)
  • have reduced liver function
  • smoke cigarettes
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. NOURIANZ may harm your unborn baby
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if NOURIANZ passes into breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take NOURIANZ or breastfeed

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

NOURIANZ and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. NOURIANZ may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how NOURIANZ works.

What are the possible side effects of NOURIANZ?
NOURIANZ may cause serious side effects, including:

  • uncontrolled sudden movements (dyskinesia). Uncontrolled sudden movements is one of the most common side effects.
  • hallucinations and other symptoms of psychosis. NOURIANZ can cause abnormal thinking and behavior, including:
  • being overly suspicious or feeling people want to harm you (paranoid ideation)
  • believing things that are not real (delusions)
  • seeing or hearing things that are not real (hallucinations)
  • confusion
  • increased activity or talking (mania)
  • disorientation
  • aggressive behavior
  • agitation
  • delirium (decreased awareness of things around you)
  • unusual urges (impulse control or compulsive behaviors). Some people taking NOURIANZ get urges to behave in a way unusual for them. Examples of this are unusual urges to gamble, increased sexual urges, strong urges to spend money, binge eating, and the inability to control these urges.

If you notice or your family notices that you are developing any new or unusual symptoms or behaviors, talk to your healthcare provider.

The most common side effects of NOURIANZ include uncontrolled movements (dyskinesia), dizziness, constipation, nausea, hallucinations, and problems sleeping (insomnia).

These are not all the possible side effects of NOURIANZ.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see full Patient Information for NOURIANZ.

References: 1.NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf. 2.Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson’s disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144.

References: 1. Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson's disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144. 2. Mori A. Mode of action of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists as symptomatic treatment for Parkinson’s disease. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2014;119:87-116. 3. Varani K, Vincenzi F, Tosi A, et al. A2A adenosine receptor overexpression and functionality, as well as TNF-α levels, correlate with motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease. FASEB J. 2010;24(2):587-598. doi:10.1096/fj.09-141044. 4. Fuxe K, Marcellino D, Genedani S, Agnati L. Adenosine A2A receptors, dopamine D2 receptors and their interactions in Parkinson's disease. Mov Disord. 2007;22(14):1990-2017. doi: 10.1002/mds.21440. 5. Morelli M, Di Paolo T, Wardas J, Calon F, Xiao D, Schwarzschild MA. Role of adenosine A2A receptors in parkinsonian motor impairment and L-DOPA-induced motor complications. Prog Neurobiol. 2007;83(5):293-309. 6. Morelli M, Blandini F, Simola N, Hauser RA. A2A receptor antagonism and dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease. Parkinsons Dis. 2012;2012:489853. doi: 10.1155/2012/489853. 7. Mishina M, Ishiwata K. Adenosine receptor PET imaging in human brain. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2014;119:51-69. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-801022-8.00002-7. 8. The voice of the patient: Parkinson’s disease. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; April 2016. https://www.fda.gov/media/124392/download. Accessed June 11, 2019. 9. Hickey P, Stacy M. Available and emerging treatments for Parkinson’s disease: a review. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2011;5:241-254. 10. Stocchi F, Antonini A, Barone P, et al. Early DEtection of wEaring off in Parkinson disease: the DEEP study. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2014;20(2):204-211.

References: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf 2. Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson’s disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144. 3. Jenner P. Istradefylline, a novel adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2005;14(6):729-738. 4. Brichta L, Greengard P, Flajolet M. Advances in the pharmacological treatment of Parkinson’s disease: targeting neurotransmitter systems. Trends Neurosci. 2013;36(9):543-554. 5. Kaakkola S, Wurtman RJ. Effects of COMT inhibitors on striatal dopamine metabolism: a microdialysis study. Brain Res. 1992;587(2):241-249. 6. Kong P, Zhang B, Lei P, et al. Neuroprotection of MAO-B inhibitor and dopamine agonist in Parkinson disease. Int J Clin Exp Med. 2015;8(1):431-439. 7. Ossola B, Schendzielorz N, Chen SH, et al. Amantadine protects dopamine neurons by a dual action: reducing activation of microglia and inducing expression of GDNF in astroglia. Neuropharmacology. 2011;61(4):574-582. 8. Rubí B, Maechler P. Minireview: new roles for peripheral dopamine on metabolic control and tumor growth: let’s seek the balance. Endocrinology. 2010;151(12):5570-5581. doi:10.1210/en.2010-0745. 9. Gerlach M, Double K, Arzberger T, Leblhuber F, Tatschner T, Riederer P. Dopamine receptor agonists in current clinical use: comparative dopamine receptor binding profiles defined in the human striatum. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2003;110(10):1119-1127. 10. Ishibashi K, Miura Y, Wagatsuma K, Toyohara J, Ishiwata K, Ishii K. Adenosine A2A receptor occupancy by long-term istradefylline administration in Parkinson’s disease. Mov Disord. 2021;36(1):268-269. doi:10.1002/mds.28378.

References: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf 2. Kalia LV, Brotchie JM, Fox SH. Novel nondopaminergic targets for motor features of Parkinson’s disease: review of recent trials. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2):131-144. 3. Data on file. Kyowa Kirin Pharmaceutical Development, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

References: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf 2. Data on file. Kyowa Kirin Pharmaceutical Development, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

Reference: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf

Reference: 1. NOURIANZ. Prescribing Information. Kyowa Kirin, Inc; 2020. Accessed April 1, 2021. https://www.nourianzhcp.com/assets/pdf/nourianz-full-prescribing-information.pdf